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Telephone: 561-295-5712

LUNCH & LEARN LECTURE SERIES

with

JOAN LIPTON

Art historian Joan Lipton returns with a slide-illustrated series of talks about 

“Noteworthy Partners in Art and Facets of Their 

Professional and Personal Lives Together"

December 8, 2019

12:00 pm - 2:00pm

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec:

Exciting Paintings and Posters with Unforgettable Muses from Night Clubs and Brothels

Lautrec enlarged the scope of art by introducing high quality posters along with exciting paintings of intimate scenes from his nightly jaunts to X-rated centers of entertainment. Learn how his physical stature was compensated by his intimate friendships with these performers who posed often for him, accepting him with unconditional respect and understanding.

January 26, 2020

12:00 pm - 2:00pm

Married Partners Georgia O’Keeffe and Photographer Alfred Stieglitz:

Professional Influences, Personal Competitions

 

O’Keeffe and Stieglitz lived together in New York City and Lake George, from which they drew mutual themes, initiating aspects of modern art. Because of the latter’s infidelities, she moved to New Mexico where she developed a new life and her personal inimitable style. 

February 16, 2020

12:00 pm - 2:00pm

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera: 

Introduced Their Beloved Country’s History and Culture to the International Art World Visually

Both Kahlo and Rivera’s temperaments inspired their art but caused very negative situations throughout their lives. Her physical problems and personal conflicts with Rivera became highly autobiographical in her work. His womanizing and involvement in politics invaded his art output. However, their joint efforts with other Mexican artists created and publicized an everlasting art movement south of our border and into Latin America as well.